“Whatcom Humane Society must build a new wildlife rehabilitation center in order to continue to efficiently operate and provide care and core services to injured, abandoned and abused native wildlife in our community.  There simply is no other option.”

CURRENT SITUATION

The current wildlife rehabilitation center facilities are located on property owned by the County Parks Department.  The County is not interested in selling the property to WHS.  The facility is tiny and cramped, with no ventilation, poor acoustics, crumbling walls, cracked floors, unsafe heating and electrical systems, a failing septic system, lack of natural light and outdoor animal holding/housing areas that flood in the winter and are impossible to disinfect. In addition, the current wildlife rehabilitation center was poorly designed for animals, staff, volunteers (it is an old house with adjoining property), thus severely hampering safety.  Crucial areas for veterinary care, work stations, storage, humane education and meeting spaces are non-existent.  Travel time for staff and volunteers between the main WHS Division Street facility and the wildlife rehabilitation center is extremely costly and completely inefficient. The option to remodel or rebuild the facility is not realistic or cost effective.

The reality is that the Whatcom Humane Society must build a new wildlife rehabilitation center in order to continue to efficiently operate and provide care and core services to injured, abandoned and abused native wildlife in our community.  There simply is no other option.

WHS Wildlife Rehabiliation logo

SERVICES

Since 2014, Whatcom Humane Society has provided wildlife rehabilitation services to injured and orphaned native wildlife.  The facility is the only full service wildlife rehabilitation center in Whatcom County.

The WHS wildlife rehabilitation center is licensed to operate by the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife.  The center employs specially trained staff, including a State licensed wildlife rehabilitator and a licensed veterinary technician.  The center is supported by dedicated seasonal and year-round volunteers and interns who assist staff and help maintain the center’s daily operations.

The goal at the WHS wildlife rehabilitation center is to rehabilitate and release animals back into their native habitat and educate the community about how to humanely co-exist with wildlife. 

This past year, the wildlife rehabilitation center provided medical treatment, care, comfort and services to over 1,500 native wild animals including: deer, bald eagles, swans, owls, hawks, opossums, raccoons, skunk, robins, crows, ducks, squirrels, beavers, marine mammals, seagulls and rabbits.

The center is funded entirely by private donations and receives no State, City or County funds.

The center is staffed 7 days a week, 365 days a year. 

THE NEW FACILITY

Our new WHS wildlife rehabilitation center will be located on adjoining property near our domestic animal shelter on Division Street in Bellingham, on over 12 acres of land.  The property, already owned by WHS, has plenty of room to expand as needs arise.

Our new wildlife rehabilitation center will provide humane, stress-free housing for thousands of injured and orphaned wild animals.  To respond to the unique physical and emotional needs of each animal species, special areas for mammals, birds of prey, waterfowl, deer and other wildlife will be provided.  All animals will have direct access to natural light and air.  Special animal shelter specific technologies and materials will be used for acoustics, disease control, ventilation, energy-efficiency and long-term maintenance and upkeep.

Elsewhere in the wildlife rehabilitation center expanded veterinary/surgical areas will enhance available treatment options and will greatly improve our ability to diagnose injuries.  Efficient and humane workplaces will support our staff, volunteers and interns.  Spacious outdoor animal housing areas and flight cages will be constructed so our wild patients can receive the mental stimulation and physical rehabilitation they need in order to successfully be released back into the wild.

A wildlife ambassador courtyard with a naturalized setting will be constructed to allow our non-releasable humane education wildlife ambassadors the ability to safely educate visitors to the facility.

Designed by local architect Curt Carpenter (who, in collaboration with UC Davis Koret School of Shelter Medicine & Design designed our domestic animal shelter), the facility will be constructed by award winning local contractor The Franklin Corporation.

The cost of construction is budgeted to be $850,000.00.  These costs include architect, permitting, site preparation, construction, fencing and landscaping.

NAMING OPPORTUNITIES

The Whatcom Humane Society wishes to provide public recognition for persons, companies and organizations that generously assist with the construction of the new facility.  Current naming opportunities include:

VETERINARY CLINIC
LARGE FLIGHT CAGE
SMALL FLIGHT CAGE
DEER ENCLOSURES (2)
INDOOR MAMMAL CARE ROOMS
INDOOR BIRD CARE ROOMS
OUTDOOR WATER FOWL ENCLOSURES
OUTDOOR MAMMAL ENCLOSURES
FAWN HUTS
MARINE MAMMAL ENCLOSURE
HUMANE AMBASSADOR ENCLOSURES
INDOOR/OUTDOOR MAMMAL ENCLOSURES
SOLAR PANELS
LAUNDRY/FOOD PREP AREA
TREES / SHRUBS / BRICKS
$150,000.00
Sponsored thank you Mancha Family!
$100,000.00
Sponsored in memory of Mary “June” Shilleto
$25,000.00 (4 total)
$25,000.00 (6 total)
$25,000.00 (6 total)
$25,000.00 (6 total)
$15,000.00 (3 total)
$25,000.00
$10,000.00 (2 total)
$7,500.00 (4 total)
$25,000.00
$15,000.00 (2 total)
TBA